Daily Archives: November 1, 2017

Beyonce Cast as Nala in Disney's 'Lion King' Remake

Disney’s Lion King remake will feature the voices of Beyoncé and Donald Glover in the lead roles (Nala, Simba, respectively). Jon Favreau, who directed the Jungle Book remake, is directing the Lion King movie. The release date is set for June 19, 2019, according to The Hollywood Reporter

Beyoncé last voiced a character in the 2013 animated movie, Epic. Previously, she performed in a variety of movies including Austin Powers in Goldmember, Dreamgirls and Obsessed

The new Lion King will also feature the voices of notable actors and comedians such as John Oliver (voicing Zazu), Billy Eichner (Timon), Seth Rogan (Pumbaa), Keegan-Michael Key (hyena) and Eric Andrea (Azizi). James Earl Jones, who voiced the lead role of Mufasa in Disney’s landmark 1994 original, will reprise his role in the remake. 

“It is a director’s dream to assemble a talented team like this to bring this classic story to life,” Favreau in a statement.

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Lana Del Rey on Weinstein Scandal: 'I Support Women Who Have Come Forward'

Lana Del Rey said she is retiring her 2012 song “Cola” in an interview with MTV News. The song gained renewed attention in the aftermath of the Harvey Weinstein sexual assault allegations, because it was rumored to be about Weinstein.

“When I wrote that song, I suppose I had a Harvey Weinstein/Harry Winston-type of character in mind,” Del Rey said. “I envisioned, like a benevolent, diamond-bestowing-upon-starlets visual, like a Citizen Kane or something. I’m not really sure. I thought it was funny at the time, and I obviously find it really sad now,” she continued. “I support the women who have come forward. I think they’re really brave for doing that.”

According to a Page Six article, Del Rey’s original lyrics name-checked the Hollywood mogul. “I got a taste for men who are older. It’s always been, so it’s no surprise. Harvey’s in the sky with diamonds and he’s making me crazy. All he wants to do is party with his pretty baby.” Del Rey allegedly dropped the reference after Weinstein insisted she change the lyrics. 

Del Rey doesn’t clarify her own relationship with Weinstein or his reported connection with the song, but said she feels “uncomfortable” performing “Cola” given recent events and that retiring it feels like “the only right thing to do.” 

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Watch Danny Brown Reflect on Detroit Life in Documentary Trailer

Danny Brown reflects on his Detroit roots in an introspective trailer for Live at the Majestic, an upcoming documentary about the acclaimed rapper. Director Andrew Cohn (Kid Danny, Medora) helmed the project, out November 7th via Apple Music.

The clip opens with Brown onstage at his home city’s Majestic Theatre, telling a rowdy audience, “I’m partying with my family right now.” From there, the teaser veers from archival footage to nostalgic modern day interviews to weed-fueled studio sessions. “I always wanted to be this rap star,” Brown says, adding, “You had to be a certain type of way to come out of Detroit and be a rapper.”

Midway through the video, a series of fans praise Brown for his “introspective side” and lyrics that “make you feel like you’re not alone.” Another interviewee adds, “That guy is a like a meteor just felt out the sky and just laughed.”

Danny Brown: Live at the Majestic follows Brown through his early days an emerging rapper, the adderall-assisted recording sessions for 2011’s XXX and his subsequent touring.

Brown, who issued his most recent LP, Atrocity Exhibition, in 2016, recently announced his fourth Bruiser Thanksgiving event. Lil B will co-headline the show, scheduled for Wednesday, November 22nd at Detroit’s Club Fantasy.

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'MUGO – Music On the Go' Selected as the Most Promising Israeli Startup of 2017

MUGO’s founders after winning Israel's Most Promising Startup awardTEL AVIV, Israel, Nov. 1 , 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Hundreds of startups vied for the coveted title of “Most Promising Startup” with only eleven startups making the finals. “MUGO” won first place by a landslide and will represent Israel in Barcelona at the 2018 MWC, the world’s largest…

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Hear U2's Exuberant New Song Featuring Kendrick Lamar

U2 recruited Kendrick Lamar for a spoken word cameo on their exuberant new song “Get Out of Your Own Way,” the latest preview of their upcoming 14th LP, Songs of Experience.

The track opens with Bono crooning over a quiet electronic pulse and bass before building to an arena-size chorus that recalls the melodic surge of their 2000 hit “Beautiful Day.” Bono chronicles an ambiguous eternal struggle on the track, belting, “I could sing it to ya all night, all night/ If I could, I’d make it alright/ Nothing’s stopping you except what’s inside/ I can help you, but it’s your fight, your fight.” 

Lamar, who previously recruited U2 for a cameo on his DAMN. track “XXX.,” appears in the song’s final section, delivering a brief monologue over the Edge’s rippling guitar. 

Songs of Experience pre-orders include instant downloads of “Get Out of Your Own Way,” lead single “The Best Thing About Me” and the album version of “The Blackout,” which the band issued as a live performance video in August. Pre-orders of the deluxe edition – which features four additional tracks – also include Kygo’s remix of “You’re the Best Thing About Me.”

On Wednesday, U2 detailed the track list for Songs of Experience, which Jacknife Lee and Ryan Tedder co-produced alongside Steve Lillywhite, Andy Barlow and Jolyon Thomas. The band also announced their 2018 North American eXPERIENCE + INNOCENCE Tour, which launches May 2nd in Tulsa, Oklahoma and concludes June 29th in Newark, New Jersey.

Songs of Experience Track List

1. “Love Is All We Have Left”
2. “Lights of Home”
3. “You’re The Best Thing About Me”
4. “Get Out of Your Own Way”
5. “American Soul”
6. “Summer of Love”
7. “Red Flag Day”
8. “The Showman (Little More Better)”
9. “The Little Things That Give You Away”
10. “Landlady”
11. “The Blackout”
12. “Love Is Bigger Than Anything in Its Way”
13. “13 (There is a Light)”

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U2 Announce 2018 Experience + Innocence Tour, Detail New Album

U2 is wrapping up their Joshua Tree 2017 tour before their new album Songs of Experience arrives next month. Now, the band announced its next foray: the 2018 North American leg of their Experience + Innocence Tour, the sequel to 2015’s Innocence + Experience Tour.

The trek kicks off May 2nd at Tulsa, Oklahoma’s BOK Center and makes stops at 15 North American arenas before concluding June 29th at Newark, New Jersey’s Prudential Center. Visit U2.com for complete ticket information. Each ticket purchased will be accompanied by a copy of Songs of Experience. The group has teamed up with Citi and Live Nation to participate in the Verified Fan program, the new service used by Bruce Springsteen and Taylor Swift in an effort to combat scalpers.

In addition to the tour, U2 detailed their December 1st-bound album Songs of Experience, complete with the LP’s 13-song track list. The album features the previously released tracks “You’re The Best Thing About Me” and “The Blackout” as well as “The Little Things That Give You Away,” which U2 debuted during their Joshua Tree 2017 tour. 

“American Soul” is a fleshed-out version of “XXX,” the band’s collaboration with Kendrick Lamar that featured on the rapper’s Damn. The digital and CD deluxe edition version of the LP features four additional tracks. Fans who preorder Songs of Experience will also receive the just-released album track “Get Out of Your Own Way” as an instant download. 

U2 also unveiled the album’s front cover, a photograph of band members’ teenage children Eli Hewson and Sian Evan as photographed by U2’s longtime visual collaborator Anton Corbijn.

U2 Tour Dates

May 2 – Tulsa, OK @ BOK Center
May 4 – St. Louis, MO @ Scottrade Center
May 7 – San Jose, CA @ SAP Center
May 11 – Las Vegas, NV @ T-Mobile Arena
May 15 – Los Angeles, CA @ The Forum
May 22 – Chicago, IL @ United Center
May 26 – Nashville, TN @ Bridgestone Arena
May 28 – Atlanta, GA @ Infinite Energy Arena
June 5 – Montreal, QC @ Bell Centre
June 9 – Uniondale, NY @ Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum
June 13 – Philadelphia, PA @ Wells Fargo Center
June 17 – Washington, DC @ Capital One Arena
June 21 – Boston, MA @ TD Garden
June 25 – New York, NY @ Madison Square Garden
June 29 – Newark, NJ @ Prudential Center

Songs of Experience Track List

1. “Love Is All We Have Left”
2. “Lights of Home”
3. “You’re The Best Thing About Me”
4. “Get Out of Your Own Way”
5. “American Soul”
6. “Summer of Love”
7. “Red Flag Day”
8. “The Showman (Little More Better)”
9. “The Little Things That Give You Away”
10. “Landlady”
11. “The Blackout”
12. “Love Is Bigger Than Anything in Its Way”
13. “13 (There is a Light)” 

Deluxe Edition Tracks:

14. “Ordinary Love (Extraordinary Mix)”
15. “Book Of Your Heart”
16. “Lights of Home (St Peter’s String Version)”
17. “You’re The Best Thing About Me (U2 vs Kygo)”

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Legendary Rock Icon Rod Stewart Announces Return To Las Vegas In June 2018 With New Dates For Headlining Residency At The Colosseum At Caesars Palace

LAS VEGAS, Nov. 1, 2017 /PRNewswire/ –Music legend Rod Stewart will return to Las Vegas in June 2018 to resume his ongoing, acclaimed residency “Rod Stewart: The Hits.” at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace.  Tickets for six new shows June 12 – 23, 2018 will go on sale to the public Saturday…

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Reach Media's Tom Joyner Announces Anita Baker Will Perform On The 19th Annual Tom Joyner Foundation Fantastic Voyage Cruise Sailing April 29 – May 6, 2018

DALLAS, Nov. 1, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Tom Joyner announced that guests aboard the 2018 Tom Joyner Foundation Fantastic Voyage will be treated to an exclusive Evening With Anita Baker. The eight-time Grammy Award winner will honor radio pioneer Tom Joyner by performing live aboard his…

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Bruce Dickinson on Life in and Out of Iron Maiden, Surviving Cancer

“I don’t really read autobiographies,” says Bruce Dickinson, the Iron Maiden frontman and solo artist who just happens to be promoting his own memoirs. “So when I decided to write my own, I sampled a few – as in, going to a bookstore, not buying the book and opening at random and going, ‘OK, this reads like a shopping list.’ ‘OK, this is self-centered and boring.’ You go through these celebrity biographies and you think, ‘God, shallow’ and, ‘This is a bit desperate.'”

Luckily for Dickinson, he has enough of a sense of humor about himself to make his book, What Does This Button Do?, both insightful and entertaining. Throughout, he interweaves stories of Iron Maiden’s glory and playing solo shows in war-torn Sarajevo with tales of recovering from falling off stages. He offers glimpses into his offstage life, whether it’s fencing, piloting 757s, hosting a radio show or writing novels and screenplays – all with the requisite tales of bumps, scrapes, hurt feelings and terrifying engine malfunctions. And, in the book’s longest chapter, he opens up about the battle with cancer that nearly sidelined his singing career.

For at least the past decade, he says, people have begged him to write his memoirs, but he’s resisted. “It’s a bit early,” he says. “I’m not done yet.” He changed his mind about writing a book after he got cancer. “When I got done with it, finished, clear of it, I thought, ‘This is probably nature’s cattle prod to go,'” he says. “It’s actually not a bad end point for a book – not that I’m planning on checking out anytime soon. It’s the beginning of a whole new chapter of the rest of your life. So I thought, because I’ve got an end, the beginning is pretty easy.” So he started writing out his story in college-ruled notebooks.

Today, Dickinson is seated in an otherwise unremarkable conference room in his book publisher’s office, high up in a Manhattan skyscraper. Copies of his book sit on a glass table next to his porridge, which he waits to eat until after the interview. As he speaks, he leans back and makes eye contact, looking relaxed in a way that suggests he has nothing to hide but still with the same intensity he projects while leaping around arena stages, commanding audiences to “Scream for me!” And despite his energy, when he looks back on his life so far with Rolling Stone, he’s in a reflective mood.

What sorts of ground rules did you give yourself when you began writing?
I’m quite happy to reveal things about myself, but it’s not my business nor is it moral to reveal things about other people that they wouldn’t be willing to reveal about themselves. It’s not their book. In a similar vein, I left out wives, children, divorce since it’s not their book in a sense. Because you’re a celebrity, whether you like it or not, whatever you say in a book, impinges massively on other people. I don’t need to indulge in the salacious stuff or tittle-tattle. There’s no point – it’s not [Mötley Crüe’s memoir] The Dirt.

Does it feel strange to you to write about your early girlfriends but not your wife?
I think if you throw marriages and things like that in, you automatically have to throw in divorces and all the rest of it. It’s part of your life, but not part of your life that’s any relevance to other people. I think you open a big can of worms there, which I don’t see as any point in doing. The point of the book is to tell some great stories.

When you wrote about your childhood, you mentioned that you were bullied for being short. What strikes you when you look back on your life and how that shaped you?
[Pauses] I’ve spent my whole life forgetting that I’m five foot six, posing for photos like, “Make sure you get the half in” [laughs]. And the thing about fights is that you come up with a kind of morality. You fight to defend what you think is right, and you don’t fight for the hell of it. I’m not very fond of aggressive people that take up too much space in bars. I spent an awful lot of my time at school having bossed up some people like that, for calling them out and saying, “You’re an asshole.” You shouldn’t say things like that, but you just do.

My son’s got himself into so much trouble for telling the truth about people. I’m like, “You can’t say that, even if it’s true.” He’s like, “Why not?” I say, “It’s complicated.” It’s part of growing up.

On that note, in the book, you address some of the times when you shot your mouth off, namely when you said Iron Maiden were better than Metallica. What do you think about things like this now?
Look, I’m acutely conscious that when you say things in print, people are going to pick up on things. The stuff about Metallica, quite frankly, was a really good windup. We have a great relationship with Metallica. It wasn’t aimed at Metallica. It was aimed at the rest of the world to say, “We’re back and we mean it. We mean it so much that we’re going to say something pretty outrageous, so why don’t you come to the show and find out. We dare you.” It’s throwing down the gauntlet, and I’m the lead singer. It’s my job. It’s what I do.

So is it arrogant? Uh, yeah. You’re the lead singer of Iron Maiden, and you’re going to be arrogant every now and again, because it kind of goes with the territory, yeah. Mick Jagger, is he arrogant? Yeah, probably – it’s Mick Jagger, for fuck’s sake. Do I make a distinction between me walking down the street and me onstage with Iron Maiden? Yeah.

How would you describe that, the difference between being onstage and off?
It’s like you have a little internal balloon. Normally, you walk around and it’s in the little flaccid deflated state inside your head, and nobody sees it. When you walk out on that stage, you have to inflate that balloon, and it has to touch everybody in the audience. So out it comes, and you know, the bigger the place, the bigger the balloon, so you end up bringing Mr. Montgolfier and his enormous balloon. Then at the end of the show, the balloon has to deflate all the way down, and you have to resume normal service with the rest of humanity. That takes a few hours, I can tell you.

Actually, some people never manage it, and they end up doing heroin or whatever the fuck they do, to try and adjust from that transition. The balloon is real and permanent, so they walk around with this permanent balloon and they can’t manage to get through doorways or have a normal conversation with people. “There’s a hundred-foot balloon in front of me, look at me.” So it’s a skill.

When did you learn that skill?
It’s hard to put a finger on it. I started after the Number of the Beast tour. I realized that I could do this thing. I could project. I thought, “I can’t carry this thing around with me in everyday life.” And you’re young, so what happens is you go on a high, you go out to clubs and bars and things, which I did back in the day a lot, and you have a few beers and all of a sudden here comes the big balloon. I’ve got a few beers, and it’s like Jekyll and Hyde. Mr. Hyde comes out and he’s onstage, and you have to learn how to deflate him and put him in his box and say, “Back to bed now. Your day is done.”

So I started dealing with it around the end of the Number of the Beast tour with varying degrees of success. I did fencing and doing these things culminating in me leaving the band, and then culminating in me learning to do it all over again. By the time I went back into Maiden, I had a much more balanced appreciation of what it was going to be like. Going back into Maiden, we did the Brave New World tour and everything, and I went, “I know how to do this. I can blow up this bubble and I’m going to say that we’re better than Metallica. That’s going to fuckin’ piss everybody off.” But I said it because I knew it would piss everyone off. I knew it wouldn’t piss Metallica off, because they’re Metallica. What do they care?

On the subject of you leaving the band, I was surprised to read how disillusioned you were with performing in the mid-Eighties, well before you quit. Why was that?
I was walking a thin line between self-criticism, self-doubt and the liability. You’re in a very successful band, and they have a pretty defined style, and they’re doing great. It doesn’t seem to matter what they do, it sells. That worried me. I was like, “If everybody is going around blowing smoke up your ass about how good this stuff is, how do you know it’s really great?” And that’s the whole thing about papal infallibility: How could the Pope ever be wrong? He’s the Pope, right? What if he is wrong?

I really began to feel that that was what was going on with Maiden, and nobody else did. It culminated when I did one solo album [1990’s Tattooed Millionaire], which did very well, actually, but it was a complete pastiche. There were a couple of good tunes. It was well executed, but it was like a Saturday Night Live version of a classic-rock album. There was a ballad sketch, there was a groovy sketch, there was an AC/DC sort of sketch. Literally. We assembled the record like that because we only had two weeks to write it. It was very successful, and I thought, “That’s kind of weird.” I thought, “I’ll have to do something different with the next one.” But nobody else wanted me to.

They all said, “Just do another one of those.” Everybody was happy with it, because it did well, but I was not happy with it. Artistically speaking, there was only one song on there that I thought was really good, which was “Born in ’58,” and the rest of them were not earth-shattering. We’re not going to break the mold of the pantheon of rock music with this, and that’s what you’re looking for. With every album, you should be looking for the fucking holy grail, not just rearranging the ornaments on the altar. So that’s what drove me with the next solo album [1994’s Balls to Picasso]. But I had no clue about where to look for whatever the holy grail was.

I realized that being in Maiden, I was immersed in the culture and I felt it had somehow enfeebled my artistic sense. In the meantime, I had left Iron Maiden and I think people around me thought there was a plan, and there wasn’t. The song “Tears of a Dragon” – “I throw myself in the sea/Release the wave, let it wash over me” – that’s where I was at. I was floating downstream going, “I hope I end up on some kind of shore that’s not too rocky.” That was it. I left Iron Maiden to find out what was beyond. If I’d stayed, I’d never have found out, because nobody was going to tell me the truth about anything I did.

What’s different now?
Going back, it’s been a whole different set of relationships with everybody. It’s much more real, much more, in some ways, grown up. We all accept that some of the time we like each other, some of the time we don’t, but we all get on because we have to get on. Our loyalty is not to each other; it’s to the Iron Maiden mother ship, the one that gave birth to us, which it did. We all share everything a lot more now than we did way back then, so that’s different. We are a lot more in control of what we do now as well, and not in a sort of obsessive-compulsive way, but simply in the way we say, “Look, we’re not going to do a 13-month tour,” because we’re going to be dead or in the funny farm.

I said to my manager, “We need to do amazing shows now. Back in the Eighties, we weren’t doing amazing shows. We were doing a lot of shows, and you can’t do amazing shows if you’re doing a lot of shows, because your body just fades away and your voices break.” I felt like it more than anyone else back then. Before the Somewhere in Time tour, I just went into that tour going, “I’m just going to be the singer; I’m going to stop trying so hard.” Then a couple albums later, I quit.

Coming back, we started making some ground rules for ourselves. We said, “Let’s do three months touring a year, and we love it.” I really look forward to it. We all do. We like to work hard; we don’t like to be destroyed. I love being in the band far more now than I did in the Eighties. It’s much more fun now.

One of the major turning points in the book was when you played a solo concert in Sarajevo, which was under siege during the Bosnian war at the time. How did that change your outlook on humanity?
Well humanity is both incredibly inspirational and unbelievably disappointing when you go to a war zone. It brings out the best and the worst in every aspect of humanity. You get incredible acts of selflessness, and you get appalling acts of brutality and cruelty that are simply breathtaking, where you can’t believe human beings could do such things to other human beings.

Sarajevo was the longest siege in history; it was longer than the siege of Stalingrad. And this was in the latter half of the 20th century – in Europe. People were living like rats. They were down to three days’ supply of food and diesel, and they had no power. There’s an amazing documentary that’s been made about it [Scream for Me, Sarajevo]. He went back, and he interviewed a lot of the kids that were at the show, and said, “How did it change your life?” It’s heartbreaking. There was a kid saying he was 11 years old, and his mom was crying because she couldn’t feed them because they have no gas, no electricity, half the house was blown away. He said, “Don’t worry, mom.” And he went and burnt the furniture to boil water, and his mother was sobbing and he was saying, “It’ll be fine. I’ll look after you.” That was in the beginning.

It was brutal. To go into that, even for three or four days felt like a lifetime. To come out of it, to come back into the Western world in the full throes of Christmas and consumption and, “Go buy this and buy that,” I’m just sitting there going, “I don’t think anybody gets how unbelievably lucky we are to not be in that situation.” Sarajevo was a beautiful city. It was cultured. The 1984 Olympics were there. How could that possibly happen? And it did. People were murdering each other on a regular basis. You’re thinking, “Jesus. This is a heartbeat away from what could happen in any circumstance anywhere.” So you start getting impatient with people who seem to be self-centered and selfish. You go, “Oh, you’re just an asshole. Why don’t we transplant you for five minutes onto the front line, see if you’d make a life there.”

It seems like this has really stayed with you.
It really has. You can only imagine what it’s like for soldiers who exist in that environment for six months at a time, whether it’s Iraq, Afghanistan, Sarajevo, Bosnia, even as peacekeepers. You see such terrible things.

I used to fly as an airline pilot to Sierra Leone and used to stay for three or four days. Funnily enough, I used to fly there during the war, but we’d land and take off during the curfew. It didn’t affect me as much as it did being in Sarajevo, because that was a shooting war, but it was harrowing in Sierra Leone. You’d go to the amputees’ camp, and you’d see these people who had their arms and limbs hacked off by the rebels, and living in, literally, shit. They’re living in a place with open sewers, shanty tents – and this is the UN amputee center and you’re going, “Fuck.” These people have nothing, and they’re the most generous, kind-hearted people you ever meet. It’s a very sad, beautiful place. It has a similar effect, but not quite as much as Sarajevo in this way. I’m sure if you’d been there during the Ebola thing it would have been pretty harrowing for sure.

The other major turning point in the book is your cancer. How did you deal with the depression and hopelessness?
When I got diagnosed, it was like an out-of-body experience, like someone is talking to somebody else in the room. Like, “Me? I have cancer? Really?” Then you’re thinking you might die. Then it’s like, “Do you feel sick? Maybe this is a terrible mistake,” but you know it’s not. So there’s that moment. Then there’s the acceptance: “OK, what do we do with it? Let’s make a plan and get on with it.”

I thought, maybe I should be angry about this. Perhaps I should sit there and meditate and stab it with my steely knives, then I thought, “That’s exhausting. I have a feeling I’m going to leave all my strength to just get through the treatment. I can’t waste all my energy hating things. That really is a waste of energy.” I’ve got chemo. I’ve got radiation. I’ve got to try and live my life and look beyond it. That’s how I dealt with it. Then at the end of it, when I got the all clear, and you go, “It’s gone?” You almost go, “Really? I kind of miss it.” Because you’ve been living with it for three months. It’s weird. It’s like Stockholm syndrome. Then you’re like, “Don’t be so fucking stupid.” You’re almost afraid to step out into the light, because you’ve been in this dark place for three to six months. And then you sort of go, “What do we make of the rest of life then?” After eight, nine months, after starting to sing again and things like that, you finally come out of it, and I thought, “Life is just amazing.”

How has it changed you now?
It hasn’t changed my view of dying. Dying is absolutely inevitable, always has been, always will be, but it’s made me change my view about living, which is that it’s not the space between living and dying. Living is living now [touches the table], every minute, every second, for right now. Not because I think a bad thing is going to happen tomorrow, but because it’s worth celebrating. Life is just a fucking amazing thing. That’s the little gift that it gave me. That’s one of the reasons why when I wrote the book, I wasn’t going to write a shitty negative book. My book was going to say, “Wow, isn’t life great?”

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Watch N.E.R.D. Team With Rihanna for Bouncy 'Lemon' Video

Pharrell Williams revived his N.E.R.D. project and teamed with Rihanna for a new track called “Lemon,” which debuted Wednesday a mysterious billboard campaign hinted at the return of the Neptunes’ band.

The bouncy “Lemon,” which premiered on Beats 1 before the music video dropped moments later, opens with Pharrell setting the table before Rihanna storms the track with a minute-long rap verse.

The Todd Tourso + Scott Cudmore-directed video opens with Rihanna shaving a woman’s head in a hotel room. That woman (Pharrell’s real life dancer Mette Towley) ends up being the focus of “Lemon” as she dances in an indoor flea market.

N.E.R.D. – featuring Pharrell, Neptunes cohort Chad Hugo and Shay Haley – last released Nothing in 2010. Williams briefly brought back N.E.R.D. in 2015 for three songs on The Spongebob Squarepants Movie: Sponge Out of Water soundtrack, as well a track called “Locked Away” that Pharrell debuted on his Beats 1 radio show.

It’s unclear whether “Lemon” is a one-off single or the first salvo from a new N.E.R.D. album; the group has been teasing something with their acronym, No-one Ever Really Dies. “Lemon” itself is available to download or purchase now, with N.E.R.D. also offering a yellow 7″ single of the track backed by a Rihanna-less version of the song.

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